Islamaphobia, Donald Trump & The book ‘Presumed Guilty’ | Zain Khan &...

Islamaphobia, Donald Trump & The book ‘Presumed Guilty’ | Zain Khan & Todd H. Green

Tactical Talk: Season 5 - Episode 48 | Islamaphobia, Donald Trump & The book 'Presumed Guilty' with Zain Khan & Todd H. Green

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Tactical Talk (Update) A California coffee shop worker refused to serve a customer who insulted a Muslim woman wearing a niqab in a confrontation recorded on video, the AP reports. The Press-Enterprise reports the clip posted online Monday was shot at a Riverside Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf. It shows a man asking “Is this Halloween?” while standing in front of the woman wearing the head covering. When the woman confronts him, he replies he doesn’t like her religion. Voices can be heard shouting for the man to leave. A supervisor who identifies herself as Tawny Alfaro refuses to sell him coffee while saying he was being disruptive and racist. The Muslim woman replies with a “thank you.” Alfaro couldn’t be reached Tuesday. Coffee Bean officials didn’t respond to a request for comment.

Tactical Talk: Season 5 – Episode 48 | Islamaphobia, Donald Trump & The book ‘Presumed Guilty’ with Zain Khan & Todd H. Green

Zain Khan invites Todd H. Green on Tactical Talk to discuss Islamaphobia & Donald Trump and their impact on American Values. They also discussed Todd H. Green’s new book Presumed Guilty: Why We Shouldn’t Ask Muslims to Condemn Terrorism.

About the Book:
All of us should condemn terrorism–whether the perpetrators are Muslim extremists, white supremacists, Marxist revolutionaries, or our own government. But it’s time for us to stop asking Muslims to condemn terrorism under the assumption they are guilty of harboring terrorist sympathies or promoting violence until they prove otherwise. Renowned expert on Islamophobia Todd Green shows us how this line of questioning is riddled with false assumptions that say much more about “us” than “them.”

Green offers three compelling reasons why we should stop asking Muslims to condemn terrorism:
1) The question wrongly assumes Islam is the driving force behind terrorism
2) The question ignores the many ways Muslims already condemn terrorism.
3) The question diverts attention from unjust Western violence.

This book is an invitation for self-examination when it comes to the questions we ask of Muslims and ourselves about violence. It will open the door to asking better questions of our Muslim neighbors, questions based not on the presumption of guilt but on the promise of friendship.
Click here to buy the book

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